10 Fun DIY Science Projects To Amaze Your Kids At Home

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Are you trying to push your kids more for science, technology, engineering and also mathematics in their school? Well, why do not try to make you like the best partner of their science experiments at home? In fact, the trend of science experiments at home is so high that is always exciting t try.
So, if you are a parent and you think that you want to do something more than just to clean the toilets with your kids, these 10 great science projects are worth to try. The projects do not require hard-to-find materials. Here are the best projects for both older and younger students to try at home.

1. Bleach + Water + Food Coloring

This project is so easy. Check out how bleach amazes your kids.
Materials:

  • Two clear plastic cups
  • Food coloring (red is great to use)
  • Bleach
  • Water

Steps:

  1. Fill one plastic cup three-quarters of the way with water
  2. Add several drops of food coloring to the water and mix it up until it is red/pink
  3. Fill the other plastic cup one-quarter of the way with bleach
  4. Slowly add the bleach to the water mixture
  5. Watch as the bleach expands the molecules of dye attached to the water molecules, thereby making the water look clear again

Note: Do not under any circumstances drink the bleached water!
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2: A Ketchup packet + Water

Materials:

  • A ketchup packet
  • One or two-liter of a plastic bottle with a three-quarter of the way to the top with water.

Steps:

  1. Pop the ketchup packet into the bottle
  2. Squeeze the bottle to see if you can make the packet move up or down.
  3. Try different packets, such as those of mustard or soy sauce. Do they move the same way as the ketchup packet did?

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3. Ice Cubes + Very Hot Water

This experiment will show your kids to make a rain inside your home.
Materials:

  • A plate
  • A glass mason jar
  • Ice cubes (about one or two cups)
  • Very hot water

Steps:

  1. Place the hot water into the glass jar, about a third of the way up.
  2. Put the plate on top of the jar.
  3. Place all the ice cubes carefully on the plate.
  4. Watch the inside of the jar start to exhibit rain!

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4. Sunscreen + Black Construction Paper

Teach your kids why they must wear sunscreen.
Materials:

  • Some sunscreen
  • Black construction paper

Steps:

  1. Put a dab of sunscreen onto the paper and then smear it around.
  2. Place the black construction paper into direct sunlight for a few hours.
  3. Notice how the construction paper fades where the sunscreen wasn’t applied.

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5. Celery Stalks + Water + Food Coloring Shades

We think all kids love to check out science experiments with the foods. What they will learn is food coloring. It is fun to see them playing with celery.
Materials:

  • Some celery stalks
  • Water
  • Clear glasses
  • Several shades of food coloring.

Steps:

  1. Fill each glass halfway with water
  2. Add some food dye to each glass
  3. Cut the celery stalks so the leafy part is at the top
  4. Place the other end directly into the glass
  5. Over several hours, the colored water will begin to move up into the stalk.
  6. After a period of time, the kids will see how the porous celery has absorbed the colored water.

Warning: make sure that no one eats this experiment to avoid the allergic to food dyes.
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6. Dyed Water + Plastic Grocery Bag

This is the best experiment that all kids will love it.
Materials:

  • One- or two-liter clear bottle (cleaned)
  • A clear plastic grocery bag
  • Dyed water (blue is nice)
  • Scissors
  • A white string

Steps:

  1. Fill the bottle halfway with the dyed water
  2. Lay out your plastic grocery bag
  3. Start cutting it into small strips (you may need to do some trial runs with this)
  4. Tie the strips together to form a jellyfish-like shape
  5. Now, push the plastic “jellyfish” into the dyed water
  6. Gently add more dyed water on top of it, leaving at least two or three inches of air at the top of the bottle
  7. Tightly secure the top to the bottle, and then allow your children to play with the “jellyfish in a bottle”.

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7. Magnet + Soda Bottle + Pipe Cleaner

Materials:

  • 2-liter soda bottle
  • Half-inch long pipe cleaner bits
  • Large magnet

Steps:

  1. Get an empty, clear two-liter soda bottle.
  2. Fill it with half-inch long pipe cleaner bits. (You can just cut them to this size.) There should be about 3-4 inches worth at the bottom of the soda bottle when you’re finished.
  3. Now, let your child use a larger magnet to run along the side of the soda bottle. The metal-based pipe cleaners will be attracted to the magnets.

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8. Water + Some Easy-to-find Kitchen Items

This is another fast experiment that doesn’t take much time to set up but can provide a lot of fun discussions.
Materials:

  • A clear bowl filled with water
  • Several other bowls each filled with a variety of items: salt, sugar, baking soda, rice, tea, coffee, spices.

Steps:

  1. Allow your child to put one ingredient into the bowl of water.
  2. Then, see if it dissolves.
  3. Continue with the experiment, removing the old water and re-filling the bowl each time.

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9. The Elephant Toothpaste

Have you ever wondered what elephant toothpaste might look like? Tell your kids that you’re going to make some together.
Materials:

  • A two-liter soda bottle, cleaned
  • Hydrogen peroxide solution (at least 6% or greater)
  • Dishwashing soap (liquid)
  • Warm water
  • One yeast packet
  • Food coloring
  • A cooking pan (such as for a roast)

Steps:

  1. Place the soda bottle upright in the middle of the cooking pan
  2. Fill the bottle with a half cup of hydrogen peroxide, a few drops of the food coloring, and a few drops of the dishwashing soap
  3. In another bowl, mix together two tablespoons of the warm water and the yeast, allowing the yeast to dissolve
  4. Allow your child to SLOWLY pour the yeast mixture into the soda bottle mixture and watch the elephant toothpaste come to life

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10. The Candy Cane

Have too many candy canes after the holidays? Don’t pitch them or force yourself to eat them – turn them into science projects instead!
Materials:

  • Candy canes
  • A Baking sheet
  • Oven
  • Some aluminum foil

Steps:

  1. Carefully unwrap the candy canes and place them onto pieces of aluminum foil that are shaped like they are. Put the aluminum foil and candy canes onto the baking sheet.
  2. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. When the oven is hot, pop the baking sheet into the oven. After two or three minutes, check on the candy canes. Don’t allow them to melt; they should just be malleable, not drippy! Test them with tongs, not your fingers.
  3. When they seem bendable, take them out of the oven and wait a minute so they won’t burn your hands. At the point that they can be safely touched, allow your children to twist them into shapes. M
  4. ake pretzels and circles and curlicues!

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